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How to test purity of kitchen ingredients at home - 10 simple tests

How to test purity of kitchen ingredients at home

Is it just me or sometimes you also wish that you could go 50-60 years back in time only for the sake of eating foods made from pure and authentic ingredients? I get you, we all feel like it sometimes. Sadly, that golden era of ethical production and carefree consuming has long gone and we currently live in a time where we can’t tell whether everything on our shelf is pure, authentic and real. 

Everything in our kitchen is disguised and over the years the roots of adulteration have only deepend. It is saddening that from spices to oils, dairy and cereal flours everything has been messed up with. Long chain supply stores and grocery stores have made it impossible to track where the food comes from and what sub-standard material has been mixed in it. 

Most of us have seemed to make a compromise with it. But the major concern is that the majority of the population have no idea whether their foods have been messed up with some sub-standard harmful material. 

While there is no escape from suspecting our foods there are certain do-at-home tests that you can do on your daily kitchen ingredients to make sure that they are as it is. 

So, Let’s dive in and take a look.

Spices

The very fact that spices are an indispensable part of any kitchen in India made it a lucrative opportunity for the adulteration practitioners to capitalize on. You will be amazed to know that India is the world leader in the production of spices and at the same time India is also infamous for adulterated spices.

Anyways, here are the do-at-home purity tests for spices.

 

Turmeric

Turmeric Powder:

Adulterant: Metanil yellow, lead chromate, chalk powder

Test: Take some turmeric powder in a transparent glass and add a few drops of water and concentrated hydrochloric acid to it. Next, shake it vigorously. A pink colour to the mixture indicates the presence of metanil yellow. If the mixture releases small bubbles, it indicates the presence of chalk powder.

To detect the presence of lead chromate, mix a teaspoon of turmeric powder with water. If adulterated, it will immediately leak streaks of water-soluble colour.

Easy way: One of the easiest ways to check adulteration is to add a teaspoon of turmeric to a glass of warm water. Do not stir it and leave it still for a while. Check after about 20 minutes. If the powder settles down at the bottom of the glass with clear water above, the turmeric is pure. Cloudy water indicates possible adulteration.

 

Red-Chilli-Powder

Red Chilli Powder:

Adulterant: Artificial colour, brick powder

Test: Add a teaspoon of chilli powder to a glass of water and stir it. A swirl of bright red colour indicates the presence of artificial colour while the settling of gritty sediment at the bottom of glass indicates the presence of sawdust/brick powder.

 

Coriander-Powder

Coriander Powder:

Adulterant: Husk

Test: Add a teaspoon of cumin powder to a glass of water and stir.The husk will immediately start floating on the surface while the pure spice will settle at the bottom of the glass.

 

Cumin-Seeds-Powder

Cumin Seeds/Powder:

Adulterant: Grass seeds coloured with charcoal dust, saw dust, starch

Test: Add a teaspoon of cumin powder to a glass of water and let it stay still for a few minutes.The adulterants will float on the surface while the pure spice will settle at the bottom of the glass.

Cumin seeds, on the other hands, are often mixed with grass seeds coated with charcoal dust. Rub the cumin seeds vigorously with your palms. If your palms turn black, it indicates adulteration.

 

Black-Pepper

Black Pepper:

Adulterant: Papaya seeds

Test: Add a few peppercorns to a bowl of alcohol. The papaya seeds will sink while the real corns will stay afloat.

 

Mustard-Seeds

Mustard Seeds:

Adulterant: Argemone seeds

Test: Crush or press a few seeds and check them. Argemone seeds have a rough exterior and are white inside while mustard seeds have a smooth exterior and are yellow on the inside.

 

Sugar

Sugar:

Adulterant: Chalk powder

Test: Stir in a spoonful of the salt in a glass of water for a few minutes. If the solution turns white and the residue settles at the bottom, it indicates the presence of chalk. A clear solution indicates purity.

 

Salt

Salt:

Adulterant: chalk powder

Test: Stir in a spoonful of the salt in a glass of water. If the solution turns white and a residue settles at the bottom, it indicates the presence of chalk. A clear solution indicates purity.

 

Milk

Milk:

Adulterant: Starch, detergent

Test: Mix a small sample of the product with about 20 ml of water and bring to a boil. Cool to room temperature in a transparent glass and add a drop or two of iodine solution. A blue-coloured solution indicates the presence of starch.

Mix about 10 ml of a milk sample with an equal quantity of water and shake the mixture vigorously. Milk adulterated with detergent will form a dense lather while pure milk will have a thin layer of foam.

 

Butter-Ghee

Butter/Ghee:

Adulterant: Vanaspati, vegetable oil, starch

Test: Take a teaspoon of melted ghee/butter in the test tube or transparent bottle. Add a pinch of sugar, close the container and give it a vigorous shake. Let it stand for five minutes. If a red colour appears at the bottom of the vessel, then the sample contains vegetable oil.

Melt a small quantity of the ghee/butter. Pour it into a glass jar and place in the fridge till it solidifies. Presence of separate layers indicates the presence of other oils.

Add a few drops of iodine to two teaspoons of molten ghee. Appearance of purple colour indicates the presence of starch (like mashed potato).

 

Mustard-Oil

Oil:

Adulterant: Argemone oil

Test: Take a small amount of mustard oil in a transparent glass and add a few drops of nitric acid to it. Shake vigorously and heat the mixture for 2-3 minutes. The appearance of red colour indicates the presence of argemone oil.

Adulterant: Other Oils

Test: Take a sample of the coconut oil in a glass jar or bowl and place it in the fridge for 30 minutes. If it’s pure, the entire sample will solidify. If the sample is adulterated, the other oils will be seen as a separate layer.

Dal-Besan-image

Dal/Besan:

Adulterant: Metanil Yellow

Test: Powder some dal with a pestle and mix a spoonful of it with lukewarm water. The same can be done for besan. Add a few drops of hydrochloric acid to the mixture. If it turns pink or purple, it indicates the presence of metanil yellow.

 

Tea

Tea:

Adulterant: Used/processed tea leaves that have been artificially coloured

Test: Sprinkle a teaspoon of tea powder on a moist blotting paper. If the colour of the blotting paper changes to something similar to yellow, orange or red, it indicates the presence of artificial colour in the tea powder. Pure tea leaves release colour only when they are added to hot water.

 

Honey

Honey:

Adulterant: Glucose/sugar syrup, high fructose corn syrup

Test: Add a spoonful of honey to a glass of water. If the honey disperses instantly, it indicates the presence of glucose/sugar syrup. Pure honey is denser and will instead sink to the bottom instead of dissolving instantaneously.

Another test involves mixing a tablespoon of honey, a little water and about 2-3 drops of vinegar together. If the mixture results in foaming, it indicates possible adulteration in the honey.

Now you will know if you need to change the place where you buy your groceries from. Do give these tests a try.

Sources:
https://fssai.gov.in/dart
https://www.thebetterindia.com/

 

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